All posts tagged Andy Kinnear

The Long View of a Hero…

The Long View is a Radio Four programme hosted by Jonathan Freedland where he uses stories from the past to increase understanding of current affairs and events. At Rewired tomorrow (25th of March) we are reusing some of the format, bringing heroes of past digital healthcare to the stage to shed a light on the lessons we can learn from the past and ensure we stop making the same mistakes time and time again. Why do we study history? I remember a teacher once saying to me, of course the answer was to do things better in the future!

Are we looking at heroes of digital as an example of the changes in the digital market place for health care today? If we are maybe it’s not an Alan Turing type hero we need (full genius style) but in-fact a mind more akin to Professor Richard Feynman, his famous four productivity strategies included;

  • Stop trying to know-it-all
  • Don’t worry about what others are thinking
  • Don’t think about what you want to be, but what you want to do.
  • Have a sense of humour and talk honestly.
  • Tomorrow’s heroes live on stage have been Feynman-esque in their approaches over the years.

 The Feynman way of working may be the best approach for leadership in the digital health and care arena that we could adopt.

“The only way to deep happiness is to do something you love to the best of your ability.”

And the heroes of digital health that take to the stage with me tomorrow are the embodiment of that quote. Professor Gwyn Thomas, Andy Williams and Beverley Bryant all overachieved (and continue to be huge parts of) the grand digital healthcare plan. They also applied the Feynman further principles of trusting in knowledge through teaching and taking others on a journey with them and trusting in people as friends and colleagues, not as competitors and antagonists.

Trying to shape the face of the next hero of digital health care is a challenge. We could try to use the Hasbro game Guess Who to create the ‘picture’ of the new hero we all need to step up to the front. Does it feel like the change is just about to come over the hill though with NHS X and a minister and team that seem to ‘get it’ so maybe we don’t need a Guess Who, more a guess how!

Although a hill that today has hidden Brexit shaped traps that could scupper all of our ideas and plans. We need that Long View vision of the future enabled by the lessons of the past to truly give us the blueprint we strive for. When we came up with the game we had a long list of the digital heroes of the past that we wanted on stage, Richard Grainger, Katie Davies, Nigel Bell, Gordon Hextall and Tim Kelsey all made that long list, but hero is a strong word and not everyone could agree to be on stage described as a hero.

“… but we’ve always done it like that!”

In Ireland, as Chief Information Officer I pushed hard for the removal of the culture of not trying something new. I even asked that the council of Chief Clinical Information Officers adopt the famous quote from US Navy Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper’s as their vision statement in year one,

“The most dangerous phrase in the English language; we’ve always done it that way!” became a way of trying every day to change the paradigm, a way of simply pushing harder to do something differently, sometimes simply because it is different it worked.

Looking to the past does not mean do it like that again, it means consider what happened, learn what needed to be done to get it right and avoid the mistakes that were made. We are rightly so concentrating on blueprinting the success at the moment, we do need to be careful not create one size will automatically fit all environment. My heroes of the past in digital and business didn’t simply take the blueprint and press copy, they tried hard to reapply with the lessons they learnt and make sure others could see how to apply and learn next.

My heroes from my reality today include; Tony O’Brien for his calm considered leadership. Jonathan Sheffield for his vision and steadfast refusal to take second best. Russ Branzell for demonstrating compassion as a leadership trait in the face of global influence. Kevin Holland for showing that expertise is a leadership trait best served shared. Gwyn Thomas for delivering the most inclusive organisational change a person could experience. Carrie Armitage for ensuring that the team around the leader is the most important. Phil Randles for never guarding his knowledge. Rachel Dunscombe for being all of our Messi. Andy Kinnear for leading us from the dark ages to the light. Molly Gilmartin for bringing an approach to innovation that others are just too frightened of. Gary Venchuk for teaching me when to swear appropriately. Ted Rubin for inspiring magical thinking on reputational importance. Amy Freeman for taking knowledge and constantly learning more with a goal of doing better. Sarah Moorhead for caring so much about the next person in the queue and frantically finding a way to take them with her. Dan and Chip Heath for delivering the most amazing stories and Frank Buyendijk for being my own stage presence inspiration.

Then I consider the Leeds team I am part of now and know as I look around we have a group of people that embody the long view in everything they do, a Chief Executive, an Exec, a Chair a team of digital professionals like none I have been able to work with before supporting a clinical team who learn lessons and apply them every day and can and will deliver with the patient at the centre of every moment of the day.

Heroes from a different reality and how the impact on our style is interesting as we head to London for two days of being Rewired. Seeing old faces is always a new inspiration and that’s whether we are laughing together in a social environment or listening intently to the latest story Rewired will bring us together for the first time in 2019 as a group of professionals who know how to do this, we just need to collectively move the blockers out of the way. The nations CCIO Dr Simon Eccles will undoubtedly remind us why we need to do this and why we need to do it in a better way, no jam for tomorrow but the reality of today.

Heroes of tomorrow, aspirational people who we know we can follow, stand up at Rewired and be counted because inspiring the next generation should be all of our most important job!

We could be heroes, just for one day, (or maybe at least the two days of Rewired)!

 

A year on, the Festival of eHealth

 

Today is the Future Health Summit 2017, last years event felt like the firing gun for a change in the way eHealth Ireland delivered, not just the slightly loud theme we adopted on the day but also the openness we tried to drive, the collaboration we announced we would enable and the key dates and targets we set out to be judged against. I have a team in place who want to be judged by the actions they take, meeting targets we announce seems to be the best way to enable this.

So much has happened in 12 months for what we are trying to achieve, the success of the Epilepsy Lighthouse project, the maternity deployments, the delivery of a national digital function, the move to cloud computing, the delivery of the health identifiers infrastructure, all leaps forward in a single 12 month period.

We do wish we had done more, we wanted the EHR business case to be further along, we wanted the IHI to be live and in as many connecting places as possible, both of which will happen in the next quarter but not in time for a 12 month celebration.

Two amazing digital health CIOs take on the role of running the eHealth Festival today; Rachel Dunscombe and Andy Kinnear; when I think of these two I consider how far we have to go on our journey, I have known both of them for a long time now, the work they have delivered has grown and grown and grown to the point where I think of them as leaders on a global stage, but the right sort of leaders, understated, assured and friends!

I get a quick run on the stage today at their festival. We are going to talk about story-telling and a new paradigm in digital health leadership. We have said for some time, no idea is unique, eHealth Ireland has become good at translating ideas, joining ideas up and making them Irish. (Said the man with the Barnsley accent!) So a big thanks to Social Kinetic who set us off on the journey for todays take away elements.

Our proposal is there are three new types of role in digital health that ensure the function can truly begin to tell stories to engage.

The first new role is the ‘Hacker in Chief’ a merge of the knowledge that the Chief Clinical Information Officer brings and the digital authority that the Chief Information Officer brings. Can we together hack old ideas into a position where they can deliver for digital health in Ireland? Is it really a new idea though, to talk to the customer? I was told a story recently, a story about Heathrow Terminal five when it opened its doors. T5 had a few digital problems in its first few days, one not made in the media too much is the story of the queues in the gents toilets! Bare with me a moment whilst I explain. A week in to T5 opening there were significant reports of concern, there were not enough men’s toilets in the terminal, there were queues! The digital team were on the response for all issues due to the large amount of them being resolved by digital reform, so, the digital team went to investigate. They went to ask the gents queuing why they were queueing. This innovation, talking to the customers, proved to be a huge saving for T5, because the only reason there were queues for the gents was that the tannoy outside in the terminal was not loud enough and gents from all over the UK were heading to the toilet queue to hear the gate of their flight! I guess the morale of the story though is digital people have learnt the hard way that talking to the customer is the only way to really deliver what is needed and the ‘Hacker in Chief’ is here to make sure this is part of what we do in Ireland.

The next new arrival at the digital health top table is the ‘Collaborative Sense Maker’. What we are trying to do is complex, and comes with a real risk of not making the most of the resource we have. Health anywhere is always a big organisation, its why when we ask why digital is so slow to come to health we have an answer, the sheer size and complexity of change. The ‘Collaborative Sense Maker’ has a role to help ensure that business change happens. We have tried to say, ‘No more IT projects,’ but that can’t be true, after all we are leading a team of digital professionals. I think the new meaning to this is let’s not have projects that exist just to deliver technology, lets collaborate to make sense of what is needed to deliver integrated care in health. At the recent EU wide integrated care conference here in Dublin a number of patients and carers in the audience explained that they had become known as the ‘difficult mum’, they were wearing this badge as a badge of honour. They provided care for a loved one with a complex and rare disease, as a mum or a carer they had become the person responsible for creating collaboration around care and indeed for making sense of the care delivered.

This new function can be responsible for working with ‘difficult mum’ to bring about a change supported by digital solutions that will ensure that every step of the way integrated care is the key and maybe not such a reliance on being difficult!

Finally, legitimately borrowed as a term from the Microsoft halls in Seattle is the role of ‘Chief Story Teller’, we all need to become this. The only way to engage on some of these concepts is to tell stories, telling a story is key to building engagement, trust and belief in an outcome. Creating an analogy to describe a complex journey is not new, in digital health I think it could well be essential if we are to get the engagement and buy in we need. Understanding the starting point, the end in mind and the story required to get there, classic story telling, we just need a hero (Andy) and a heroine (Rachel) to lead us there!

None of these roles need the titles in their positions, certainly we have enough chiefs kicking around the system but imagine the functions coming together to make the changes the descriptions promise. David Holzmer talks about,

‘We are witnessing the collapse of expertise and the rise of collaborative sense-making.’

I think this is the answer to so many of our needs is here in these descriptions of new roles, how to make these happen is down to anyone who works in health today, these are not digital roles, they are roles that will see health in any country set up to be patient centred and able to deliver care in a contextualised manner, a manner that citizens deserve.  

A festival of eHealth!

A year ago we were invited to be involved in the Future Health summit for the first time. We built a house as the theme for the event, from blue print to decoration eHealth experts from across the EU used the story of creating a new build as an analogy to describe how eHealth Ireland could build on the foundations it was putting in place to create an eHealth system that could deliver a digital fabric for health in Ireland.

A year later and we have a different theme this year. The eHealth Festival has been pulled together, imagine the process of moving from foundations to a woven digital fabric throughout the country and the complexity of doing this, we have landed on an analogy for this too, putting on the mega festivals across the world, Coachella, Glastonbury and Electric Picnic. Surely a task with a long term view, a success criteria that includes immediate success and bringing joy to millions of people. The team are working hard to put on the festival all day on Thursday.

The eHealth Festival is a truly global affair, taking lessons and experiences of digital health from across the globe and applying them to the plans for Ireland. The first stages will be to consider what it takes to find the right festival site and theme, applied to the delivery of eHealth this section will focus very much on how to set the vision for the future as thoroughly as possible. A number of key speakers with NHS experiences will provide us insight into how engagement was gained at a plethora of sites with very different focuses ranging from a wide ocal geography coming together to adopt a standards based approach to the adoption of an open source model across a major cities record sharing approach and on to a major London hospitals insistence to get it right and not ‘simply’ follow the model brought to bear before.

Every guest speaker has been set a number of music festival themed challenges over the day too, ranging from the slightly different event photograph to a whole series of theme songs being picked; some of the music could get loud! Picking the theme songs has been an important part for each of the presentations as it will reflect the theme of where the presentation goes, so listen out for that.

In keeping with the way eHealth Ireland has evolved over the last year there will be some focus on the way we engage on technology in health as well. One of our partners Think Visual will be able to provide a different insight into how to engage clinicians and patients in a different way, using pictures and visuals to create a journey for them to join us on. This promises to be an exciting look into the art of the possible in this area.

Our focus has been on health care and a somewhat traditional version of health care over the last twelve months, the ability to deliver a new paradigm of research capacity with digital health must not be forgotten, nor must the citizen choice in how this occurs. With this in mind we have a speaker with a huge amount of experience making a health charity digitally capable, the lessons we can take from this I am sure will set the agenda for us in this space.

As with last year we have tried hard with the theme and the brieif to speakers to keep the ‘sales pitch’ presentations away, at the eHealth Festival it would be like the Darkness reforming! But, we need to create relationships with the vendor community over the next year that is a for sure! So in keeping with the festival theme the vendor community will be putting on the record label A&R man guise and trying to encourage us to understand why their label is the one of choice, why they are the Factory Records of the 1990s and not the SAW of the 1980s.

To round off the day we have a speaker by very popular demand, an expert in information governance, information security and getting the handling of data right. Asking a lady from Liverpool to speak on the theme of securing a festival is always going to be a little dangerous so expect some fun to round the day off.

As with any great festival there will be a few secret unannounced shows too by way of a couple of announcements that should set a tone that is exciting for the next twelve months, initiatives with internal and external focuses.

All that really will remain to say is… Put Your Hands Up For Detroit – All will be revealed!