All posts tagged Imagine A World

#CIO100 The 2019 edition…

Being part of the CIO100 has meant something to me every year that I have taken part, this year I didn’t make the event itself and it looks like it was a roaring success from the photos on social media and the WhatsApp commentary from so many of the CIOs that were there.

Being able to be part of a community of leaders every year that support each other, laughs at each other, finds ways to promote each other, shares stories and battle wounds with each other has been a great way to create a collegiate environment regardless of business area that the CIO works within. I think the key take away from the CIO100 celebration year on year is the similarities that the role brings ‘regardless’ of the business area that the CIO works within.

Its fascinating moving to a new organisation as a digital leader, no longer a CIO, but a member of the team with an interest and a remit in the key items of the CIO agenda I can see now how transferable the experiences of a CIO can be.

I remember reflecting on similar when I moved to Ireland, the way we described the issues faced by us every day delivering digital to healthcare in the UK were so similar to those described in Ireland and yet both sides of the Irish sea thought they were unique.

One piece of advice, if I am qualified to give advice, to all CIOs and aspiring CIOs, get out of the business bubble you may find yourself in, use events and groups like the CIO100 to learn about the challenges of other areas embarking on digital transformation and innovation in a business area. If you have an issue today, I will bet that either it has been solved at least once in a community like the 100 already or at the very least someone else in that group is going through the same issue.

The CIO100 is perhaps the greatest support group that a digital leader in the UK can be part of, a group I am proud to call ‘home’.

Well done to everyone in the list, looking forward to a year of connections, collaborations and having some fun.

… and perosnally from me, whilst I am no longer at Leeds teaching Hospitals Trust without the amazing team there my place would never be so in the CIO100, a huge thanks to all of the team for working with me for 12 months on the crazy journey we called #LeedsDigitalWay.

Super heroes each and everyone of you!

 

AI a shiny thing or the next loop in the evolution of digital healthcare.

In 2001 AI was ‘just’ a Steven Spielberg film; in May 2018 it is being described by many as a solution too so many ills within the NHS.

On the 21st of May the Prime Minister provided the NHS with her view on the way Artificial Intelligence could revolutionise the delivery of care for patients with Cancer, Dementia, Diabetes and Heart Disease and by 2030 save 50,000 lives. Grand claims and grand plans and a new direction for government. One that focuses on a digital art of the possible although certainly to leap from paper records in vast wire cages and trolleys as an “ok” solution through to AI as an opportunity for the delivery of care is no mean feat, but a goal we can try to play our part in.

The following day Satya Nadella the Chief Executive Officer of Microsoft gathered CEOs and CIOs from digital business from across the UK to discuss what the team at Microsoft described as “Transformative AI”. The CEO used a quote by Mark Wesiser the prominent scientist of Xerox and the father of the term ubiquitous computing to open his presentation,

The most profound technologies are those that disappear. They weave themselves into the fabric of everyday life until they are indistinguishable from it.

This is where we want our EHR to get to!

The conversation continued to try to deliver the fundamentals in AI. Data is what feeds and teaches AI, it provides the fuel to grow to learn the what and the how.

Collecting more data therefore will educate AI more quickly; the next horizon is to make the nine billion micro-processors that are shipped every year become SMART devices. The micro-processor in your toaster, your alarm clock, your motion sensor light can become part of the data collection capability that will be responsible for our education of AI. The sheer growing size of data is something well documented, the creation of data will have reached a new horizon by 2020 and will look something like the figures below:

  • A SMART City – 250 Petabytes a day
  • SMART Stadium – 1 Petabytes a day
  • SMART Office 150 Gigabytes a day
  • A SMART Car 5 Terabytes a day
  • Your Home 50 Gigabytes a day
  • You 1.5 Gigabytes a day

20 Billion SMART Devices will exist in the world

(8 bits to the byte, 1,024 bytes to the kilobyte, 1,024 kilobytes to the megabyte, 1,024 megabytes to the terabyte and 1,024 terabytes to the petabyte) The average mobile phone now has 128 gigabyte; the first man went to the moon on a computer that had less memory)

So much data to educate the AI of the world, the insights that could be gained are incredible.

The journey from what we know as an IT enabled world to a digital world sees the move from ubiquitous computing to Artificial Intelligence as a pervasive way of life and then on to a world where we live in a multi-sense and multi device experience.

The impact on the relationship between us and technology has evolved in how it is perceived; technology was ‘simply’ a tool, initially as AI evolved it worked for us as a subordinate and as AI evolves still further it will become more of a social peer in how we consider what it can offer us in healthcare. The most common Christmas present in the UK this year was one of the voice activated assistant, people all over the UK are now having chats with Alexa, Siri, Cortana or simply saying Hey Google to find out some fact that just alluded them or to ask for a simple task to be done.

The original concept of distributed computing (or cloud) gives us the ability to create the computer power and data storage that is needed to evolve AI capability. Distributed compute adds IT complexity, it is now our job to find ways to tame the complexity by ensuring consistency and a unification of experiences, this applies more to digital healthcare than any other ‘business’ as we try to utilise digital as a way to standardise the delivery of care as much as we possibly can.

The definition of Artificial Intelligence is said to have been first coined in 1956 in Dartmouth, the journey from this definition now includes the term Machine Learning first applied to algorithms that are trained with data to learn autonomously and more recently since 2010 the term deep learning, where systems are enabled to go off and simply learn beyond a set of specific parameters. The art of clinical practice, the need to have a human touch though is well understood in healthcare. This is why more and more AI in healthcare is referred to as an ability to augment the delivery of care, AI does not deliver a solution to offer less clinicians in the service, what it does is remove the need to have clinical time spent on anything other than patient care, AI offers the opportunity to increase the human touch. A further quote reinforces this in the book The Future Computed;

In a sense, artificial intelligence will be the ultimate tool because it will help us build all possible tools.

Eric Drexler author of Nanosystems: Molecular Machinery Manufacturing and Computation (1992)

The journey to AI in our world is getting quicker. The journey to AI being successful is best measured when the different components of it reach parity with us humans;

  • In 2016 AI became able to see to the power of us, and passed the RESNET vision test with 96% able to see 152 layers of complexity.
  • In 2017 AI became able to understand speech to the same degree we can the 5.1% switchboard speech recognition test.
  • In January 2018 AI was able to read and comprehend to the same degree as a human passing the SQuAD comprehension test with 88.5%.
  • In March 2018 AI became better than a human at translation, now able to translate in real time successfully to an MIT measure of 69.9%.

The road to an AI augmented world though is about amplifying human ingenuity; AI can help us with reasoning and allow us to learn and form conclusions from imperfect data. It can now help us with understanding; interpret meanings from data including text, voice and images. It can also now interact with us in seemingly natural ways learning how to offer emotionally intelligent responses. A Chat Bot launched in China now has millions of friends on across multiple social media channels, it has learnt to offer help to its ‘friends’ that are demonstrating symptoms of depression, phoning up friends to wish them good night and offering advice and guidance on sleep patterns but in a very human way.

Gartner have reported that the ‘business opportunity’ associated to AI in 2018 is now worth $1.2 trillion! Suddenly AI is the new Big Data which was the new Cloud Computing, which was the new mobile first. All of these terms have had hype but have all in reality brought a new digital pitch to our business strategies and our lives.

Great Ormond Street Hospital in partnership with UCL is leading the way in AI application into healthcare with several projects delivering startlingly real results.

Project Basecode: Transcribing speech in real time and utilising AI capability to add information to spoken word dictation capture.

Project Heartstone: A device for passing messages, verbal and video to patients of GOSH that may be too young to have their own Smart Phone, the device can be expanded to offer services to children who may be deaf or blind.

Project Fizzyo: Puts in place gamification to the delivery of breathing physiotherapy for children with Cystic Fibrosis and captures the information for the clinical record offering analysis as it goes.

Sensor Fusion: Creates perhaps the most immersive AI elements in healthcare today, recording events throughout the hospital, offering machine learning developed advice and data driven descriptions of events as they occur.

At Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust we have created a platform in the form of our Electronic Health Record (EHR). With this platform we can now begin to consider how this clinical push for AI and the difference it can make to patients lives and the way we work can be achieved in a carful and considered way.

This digital revolution can make a real impact on Leeds; the patients, clinicians and staff enabling us to provide the care we want to provide following the Leeds Way principles with digital as a supportive backbone.

If you want to know more or have an idea as to how you could help in this area get in touch with us via @DITLeeds

International menu of interoperability…

First published on www.digitalhealth.net

When you are on holiday do you play that ‘why?’ and ‘what if…’ game? For example in the USA on a recent holiday we were chatting about why foods are called different things in different countries. A quick poolside thumb poll had the list below as differences between the UK and USA, and we are sure there are more:

  • Zucchini and Courgette
  • Egg Plant and Aubergine
  • Garbanzo Beans and Chick Peas
  • Arugula and Rocket
  • Cilantro and Coriander
  • Scallions and Spring Onions
  • Chips and Crisps
  • Fries and Chips

The only excuse we could come up with for why this happened was timing. These food stuffs were perhaps discovered at around the same time across the world and therefore no name was ever right or wrong, just more timely and geographically rich. The experience of being in a different country and seeing these new words for the same things adds a little nature of the exotic, particularly when the country speaks the same language (kind of).

But these differences speak to the single largest challenge that faces our digital health menu today: the challenge of interoperability and integration. When we talk about the delivery of a new healthcare paradigm we speak of the delivery of integrated care, a care delivery experience that places the patient at the centre and has no boundaries. But to achieve this requires information to mean the same thing to all those involved in its delivery. Where this isn’t possible we put in place a perpetually repeating health system; one where learning the parameters of a situation, of an illness, of a prescribed cure are repeated at each gateway to a different healthcare system. We don’t want an exotic patient experience we want an efficient and safe experience.

The journalist Geoffrey Williams once said, “You can’t understand one language until you understand at least two.” Goethe went even further claiming, “He who does not know foreign languages does not know anything about his own.” Moving healthcare delivery to a system-wide approach is the goal of over 50 (locally driven) digital initiatives in the NHS alone. The goal of an integrated health and care record is to provide access to, and translation of, multiple care languages. The pressure facing healthcare systems across the world today will only be resolved through integrated approaches that enable health and social care to work together to manage the front and back door to every major acute hospital in the system. A busy Accident and Emergency Department is no longer the problem that the acute hospital can resolve on its own, it is a system-wide issue that the geography has to resolve together. Access to information will unlock this resolution, but first we need to enable the way we refer to the healthcare to be shared.

For the last two decades sharing information between care settings has been a digital goal. In the late 1990s Hampshire became ‘famous’ for the delivery of an exemplar record sharing environment, linking access to information recorded in the ‘Exeter System’ to information in GP systems, to aid the delivery of healthcare regardless of the setting. The largest issue that stunted growth of this early pilot though was the quality of the data and the ability to index the information. The need for a common identifier across health systems was raised and the NHS Number mandated by a target date. It’s a shame that this would not be the last time the NHS number was mandated by a target date…

Jumping forward to 2017, the Irish health system delivered a unique EU-wide identifier for the delivery of healthcare to its citizens. Huge effort was put into delivering this in an agile manner at a limited cost, and today the number exists and is available but its actual implementation in healthcare delivery itself remains very patchy. We can also look at an example in Leeds today too. Having spoken to other healthcare jurisdictions, the Leeds Care Record has become well known throughout Europe as an example of local systems working together to achieve something quite remarkable. The Leeds Care Record is a platform that enables integration at a level beyond almost anywhere else in the NHS. Over 35 systems are able to share information in a controlled, secure and legitimate fashion. 111 GPs also benefit from having access to what is recorded about their patients’ hospital visit. They also share key elements of the GP record with the healthcare delivery system throughout the geography. And that word is where the Leeds Care Record does fail; it works for the geography of Leeds and so this isn’t integration, this is interoperability. In Leeds, information is shared through the same platform but the reference points for the delivery of care remain in the same ‘language’ of the originating care setting. The reliance is on the interpreter and their own understanding of the information.

Culture plays a huge part in how we create an interoperable health care system which digital supports. In his book Culture, Terry Eagleton tries to define what culture means to organisations. He has four areas that he believes are most relevant to creating the right culture: values, customs, beliefs and symbolic practices. None of these particularly speaks to a standardised way of operating and therefore, if we believe in culture being how we make things happen in an organisation, then interoperability will always be an area we strive to achieve.

In the same book Eagleton, who is from Ireland, notes that the postbox, an original integration tool, donates civilisation. However the fact that Ireland has painted its mailboxes the famous Ireland green denotes a culture, a difference to others. In Leeds we have many gold postboxes, a legacy of the London Olympics, when gold medal winners had the postbox closest to their home town painted gold as an honour. Again, culture flouting a standard.

As quickly as we can, we need to begin to agree nationally (and why not even globally) if we are to achieve integrated or interoperable healthcare systems. The standards to do this exist in so many ways already. Digital health doesn’t need changes to be made at the mega-vendor level, the systems need to adopt the standards and then innovate to exist in a ‘system of systems’ approach.

Maybe we need to use Eagleton’s four cultural reference points as starting points to creating a joint understanding of where we need to get to.

Values: The value of having integrated care has been made clear for decades. Digital leaders are still at the begging bowl though, seeking funding to deliver the necessary platforms that are required to enable information sharing. Information is now becoming more complex, faster in the way it changes and more encompassing of the healthcare experience and value needs to be placed on the innovation needed to achieve a truly interoperable healthcare system.

Customs: Local customs need to be protected but somehow we need to move from the clinical system paradigm. You know the one, where the clinician you have engaged loves the idea of a single system across the hospital, they feel it’s a great idea, but their additional one special system still needs to be protected as well. This has become known as the ‘one plus one’ clinical system and in a hospital it means we have one system, plus one for every adventurous clinician in the hospital.

Beliefs: We need the healthcare system to stand up for the belief it has in the delivery of integrated care. That belief will drive the ultimate understanding of what a system of systems digital solution can provide.

Symbolic practices: Perhaps in the NHS this is about to happen with the launch of the Local Health and Care Record Exemplars funding and a platform to enable lessons to be learned, standards to be tested at local levels (of five million population) and a real drive from the centre and from the ‘spokes’ to truly achieve this.

There has to be a hook to the original Bevan statement about the creation of the NHS, “Healthcare free at the point of contact”, so now we need data ‘free’ at the point of contact and this can only be achieved if we all have the same reference points.

Now, can I get some fries, I mean chips, I mean crisps, I mean home fries…

Digital health and the Hollywood re-boot!

What can digital health learn from the biggest trend in Hollywood block busters, the Re-Boot.

In the last 15 years Spiderman has been through three ‘re-boots’, Tobey Maguire, Andrew Garfield and now Tom Holland. Batman has managed even more changes that have brought various degrees of success (personally I thought Michael Keaton did a great job!). Digital health can learn from this trend, a re-boot or two of how digital health is ‘sold’ to the public, the tax payer and the media is perhaps a little overdue.

The cynic amongst us though would be worried of the PR agency spin at this point, but I would disagree. Earlier this week I was being taken on a high-speed car chase through the streets of Leeds, otherwise known as a taxi ride from the train station to St. James. The usual conversation, what do you do and where do you come from ensued (does anyone else feel they are on a game show sometimes when they are in a taxi?) What was surprising was how much the taxi driver knew about the digital reform of the UK health system, but here is the issue; “Was that the disastrous IT project that failed”, says the taxi driver. No matter where you go the National Programme for IT (NPfIT) is almost universally hailed as a failure, and yet the programme put in place foundations for digital health to rival any country in the world, it put in the ground work to engage the customer whether that’s the clinician or the patient. I guess much as Michael Keaton put in the ground work for the plethora of super hero movies that have become de ’rigour as the summer hit movies!

Ireland still has its own NPfIT. PPARS is still described by the Irish media as a ‘comedy of errors’, and just as NPfIT it has its failings, PPARS today is a success that can be built on! To go back to the superhero movie analogy, PPARS and NPfIT are best linked to the Daredevil and Elektra movies, Ben Affleck and Jennifer Garner vehicles of 2003, fans know these were ‘great’ films, the critics were convinced they were rotten tomatoes, but, they now have influenced some of the best Netflix superhero fodder ever to be made!

The culture and leadership of the digital team is significant in a judgement of success.

Building a team is a trick that every digital leader should accept as their number one priority. Without the team the priorities, the governance, the customer at the centre, any of the benefits of digital will not be delivered! Across the world the delivery of healthcare is under financial pressure and this in turn means that the immortal words, ‘do more for less’ are likely to be uttered to you as a digital leader.

When you then look at what you can do less of there is a risk that the things that ‘could’ be seen as not digital’s responsibility are the first to go. If your mind lands on this as a decision please, please think again!

All over the world organisations are being told digital fails without business change resource, and yet as fast as this is becoming a key message for many business areas health systems are trying to cut the business change element from the budget of digital. In Ireland, we have spent the last three years trying to reinforce the message that the projects we have set as priority projects will fail without proper business change elements. The success Ireland made of the first digital maternity hospitals was a success of the business change functions and the clinical leadership. The need to have 9,500 hours training in one of the hospitals is described in some of the Irish media as a failure, what a shame that is. Business change perhaps shouldn’t be labelled as training, I guess that’s where we went wrong in Ireland, the ‘brand’ of business change resources within the team needs to be clearer, they are the engineers of success!

In my move to Leeds I was recently asked what sort of a CIO I am? One that focuses on technology or one that focuses on information? I think I confused the person asking the question when I said I am a CIO that focuses on the people. The need to create a team that cares most about the business change we are trying to achieve; I hope is part of the legacy I leave in Ireland as I begin the handover of what I do to the next digital leader for healthcare, a team that has moved from one that delivers digital to one that helps create business change through digital innovation.

Resourcing any organisation to be able to achieve a business change is difficult, trying to ‘re-boot’ the view of the team at the same time really does require an engaged and enthused leadership team.

How will we find the right people for the right job at the right time is a tricky question for any digital leader trying to create a cultural change. It’s a challenge that we have worked hard on in Ireland. In November 2015 the department of health gave us permission to recruit 49 new members of staff to the team. An exciting time being able to consider how we could now truly begin to move the ‘dial’ on the ratio of staff available to the business and how we really could begin to focus on the delivery of business change. The trick though was what sort of staff did we need. We were pleased with permission to recruit 49, we had asked for 150 new staff which meant a prioritisation exercise and a structural alignment that matched the resource we were now allocated, a re-boot with a limited budget. Not all of the re-boots require the superstar actors and huge budgets though, think of the collection of superhero TV series now gracing the screens of Netflix, nowhere near the super budgets of Batman Vs Superman, nor do they have the big name actors and yet they are probably making a bigger dent in the film buff psyche than the most recent Batman film ever will, sorry Ben Affleck!

How do we professionalise the digital health function though, how do we become recognised as the go to function to achieve change in healthcare. First and foremost, the logic of success building on success is key. Pick the projects that can be successful, not the easy projects or the quick wins, but the projects that will make a difference and that you know can be achieved. Professionalising the digital role in health is influenced from the outside in to some degree, the clinical engagement in the success of digital will build an organisational ally to help in the consideration of what a professional digital workforce can bring.

The re-boot of digital health needs some tools as well as the new actors. The SAMR ladder has worked well for us in understanding where our focus needs to be. Are we Substituting, Augmenting, Modifying or Redefining the delivery of healthcare. Are the terms mutually exclusive or are they an innovation journey that digital healthcare is on?

Dr. Ruben Puentedura’s model gives any digital leader an opportunity not to just re boot the organisation but a model to re boot projects as well.

Lets look at PPARS in Ireland, its original premise using SAMR was to simply Substitute what was currently in use with a digital platform, what went wrong according to the general consensus is that a simple substitution wasn’t enough. The human process was exactly that, not a logical process that digital could be a substitute for but an emotional and geographically different process that actually needed a redefining re boot. The success of eReferral in the last 18 months is because the process has been augmented, and the project team set about the re boot of the process knowing that was the case.

As we move to the EHR programme here in Ireland we know that the whole programme of work has to be about redefining, that is why the business change resource is so important and its why Ireland’s EHR business case insists on the budget and resource allocation for the business change elements,

Einstein’s definition of insanity is perhaps over used, but it fits so neatly here; ‘doing the same things over and over but expecting different results’ is his tried and tested definition. Without a re boot digital health is not going to succeed and we need it to be the next Avengers re boot not the best forgotten Nicholas Cage classic, Ghost Rider.

Consider the re boot theme, build the business change resource and lets get this movie started!

MedTech the leap from Sci:Fi

Ahead of the Dublin Tech Summit (#DTS) in mid-February where we will be considering the links between what was Sci:Fi and what can now be described as Med Tech.

The leap from Science fiction to a reality gets less and less and less. Amazon Echo, Microsoft Cortana and Apple Siri, are coming so quickly from an odd idea to an accepted part of the daily life. How long before these technologies bring a new information style to healthcare. The digital persona that the Echo and the lovely Alexa are creating for Amazon are said to be worth over $200,000 per person. In some jurisdictions amazon can now value the lifetime revenue from a cohort of customers that have signed up for their Prime service to such a degree that they can actually trade against the expected profits they will make.

Would we want similar technology to come to healthcare, many today wouldn’t but what will the time line and generation gap be before we are happy for this to be the case I wonder? As many people unwrapped the Amazon Echo for Christmas this year the reaction on social media was very mixed, from why would you want the ‘stool pigeon’ in the room to I want one! And by keeping the cost of what in reality is quite an impressive piece of kit low we can see Amazon and others begin to make huge strides in tying up this market place.  

Digital personas are starting to exist in many businesses lines; imagine the Amazon digital persona of a Prime user with an Echo and its uses in the consumer arena applied to the delivery of healthcare. The data based prediction of buying patterns and the commercial power this now drives has huge potential. As Amazon step into the pharmaceutical and FCGs market places this is going to grow and grow on its impact on healthcare, the fast followers of this technology are going to be able to make a big splash in healthcare quickly.  

The digital twin is a concept now used by Rolls Royce and GE in the management of aircraft engines. Imagine a healthcare system that makes a digital twin and then offers to run ‘you’ in the same way as Rolls Royce run the aircraft engine, spotting the issue before it happens. Genomic sequencing could begin to offer us that opportunity, especially if we linked the data to a service akin to the Echo, where not just the scientific sequences were information the situational analysis of health but also the context of the person, we after all have been talking about the advent of contextualised healthcare for over a decade.

Again many will object and won’t want that information to exist or be willing to take the information risk of the information being misplaced, but some, perhaps a next generation will see the benefit of this. The blur-ing of the lines between next generation digital and Sci-Fi is becoming easier and easier, what is interesting though is the impact of digital on healthcare, the disruptive impact of technology on commerce and wider business verticals has been huge and yet in healthcare its still in its infancy, a bit like Sci-Fi of the 1970s I guess!

The beauty of slow adoption though is that untried and tested technology can be avoided and lessons can be learnt from other business areas more easily. Also, the ability to gain engagement from the user base, the clinical teams wanting to use technology has become much much easier. The consumerisation of technology has reached such a peak that more often than not the new Sci-Fi like advancement has often been tested in the home before it lands in the clinic. Take Microsoft hello, no longer will a clinician need to touch the keyboard to authenticate, hugely powerful in the application of electronic health information at the point of care. Mobile computing more generally opens up the place where care can be delivered. AI allows questions to be asked of learning made more quickly than ever before.

In the last two years Ireland has enjoyed its fair share of global recognition for its involvement in the most important Sci-Fi brand ever, Star Wars and the filming of those crucial scenes in episode seven. In the last two years Ireland has also leapt forward in its application of digital to healthcare, truly looking at how to make use of the next digital disruption enthusiastically.

Do eHealth agendas ‘need’ politics…

First published in HIMSS UK Journal in September of 2016.

 

The delivery of health is driven by politics by necessity. No matter where in the world you are the delivery of health and wellbeing to a population is an election winning and losing manifesto. We understand that the delivery of digital health could be as disruptive in its application as any other business arena globally and yet, maybe because of these intrinsic political links, eHealth has not been able to ‘just do it’ at the pace of say the tourism agenda or even the ever increasing connected cities agendas.

The Bob Wachter report, ‘Making IT work in Health’, was published in the UK in early September. Politics allegedly, is said to have even delayed its publication, an essential report that the NHS needed, a report that global health systems considering how to make the giant digital leap needed.

Why does health have to work to a political agenda and time line? As IT professionals it is frustrating. Innovation needs to be allowed to happen in an agile manner. In Ireland we are deploying solutions that are over 10 years old, we continue to deploy them because they have been backed politically but the digital landscape has moved on three generations since the inception of some of these solutions, and to be absolutely fair the solution, whilst ten years old, still makes the beneficial difference the healthcare system originally wanted to gain.

I tell a story when presenting at the moment, a second hand, legitimately stolen story I have to admit. In 1969, the ‘people’ of Hong Kong decided that they needed to create a business district. They came together and placed a mandate to develop the business district regardless of political persuasion, economic climate or technology change. Today the business district of Hong Kong is one of the most thriving globally. It is as shining example of what innovation, connected people and a clear, unambiguous and a-political mandate can achieve.

I am proud to be working in Ireland on the health care of a nation. Earlier this year our minister for health proposed that Ireland needed to move away from annual planning, annual stretch targets and annual budgets. He asked for a mandate to create a cross party commissioned group that would consider the future health of Ireland and report back to the people of Ireland what the options, and indeed solutions would be. How exciting. At last the health system of Ireland could have a plan that is longer than some repeat prescriptions!

By allowing health to be disruptive and creative, then it can consider how to catch up with other international business from a digital innovation point of view. We often ‘roll out’ the banking analogy. Citizens are happy to use mobile banking by and large, the expectation to get a real life letter from the bank has almost gone away and the bank manager is no longer recognisable on the high street as a person of status. Banking changed quickly, maybe because technology was enabled to be disruptive, not just because of the investment but because of the change in attitude and even the aptitude of the customers themselves.

Will any country ever be brave and allow a system to just do it. If clinicians and patients are engaged and want ‘IT’ then why not?

The suggestion is definitely not to do this without governance or engagement but to take away the political might, to empower the system, which is far more intelligently capable in this arena than the political system after all, to make the difference happen in clinical and technology settings! Attempts have been made in many jurisdictions to empower the public. The NHS tried the Healthspace experiment in the late 1990s and Estonia is mentioned in every EU eHealth meeting as a rising star of patient empowerment through access to information. The Danish health system is as close as it gets to a ‘Block Chain’ like health information system in 2016, where the patient truly has a level of control over the information about them. If we can make this happen then we should be able to find a way to enable the eHealth orchestration to step out from the political agenda somehow.

There is an additional moment of caution here though, which needs to be learnt and applied. The suggestion we make here is, yes to enable the politicians to take a step away and allow the agenda to deliver against a defined and agreed benefit set, it is not, and I can’t stress this enough, an ask to bring in a large group of people who do not know how health works and ask them to deliver large complex digital change agendas to health. Health is not just another business ready for change it is unique and that feared and fabled word, ‘special’!

Under the auspices of the then prime minister Tony Blair, health in the UK was labelled as a business that was ready to made like ‘Easy Jet’. Almost weekly a politician globally will reference the need to ‘Uber-ise’ the health system. I wish we could simply do that but health is huge, interlinked, has powerful and learned users that need to be taken on this journey of change. Uber-ing health would cause more of a fall out than the go-live of Uber in any city that has been globally seen so far.

Relationships with other government departments, wider politicians, parties and vendors obviously will need to continue to grow, and often politics will need to have a part to play in these burgeoning relationships. Perhaps this is the area where our digital agenda could benefit more from a political involvement. Whether it’s Mark Britnel from KPMG, David Beloff from Deloitte, Neil Jordan from Microsoft, Kaveh Safavi from Accenture or Robert Wah from CSC, Ireland has access to a wealth of advice and guidance from partners and prospective partners second to none globally. The knowledge in years alone from just the names above is so impressive, and yet there seems to be a fear from the political and civil service system to engage with these brains, which is a shame.  Partnerships with the these organisations are already in place, and of course each of them is hoping to get a larger bite of the Irish ‘cherry’, but whilst this is their end goal they have been very willing to share, to help us learn lessons and apply new ways of working and thinking. Ireland partnering with this kind of intelligence at all sorts of levels is exactly how it will implement an eHealth agenda and get it right first time.

So, if we persuade the politicians of the world to work with us to set a longitudinal ambition for eHealth, if we can persuade the same politicians to help each eHealth team agree the governance, the way in which they can be involved and the parameters and limitations of their involvement then, can we simply get on with it? Against an informed and educated back drop I really do think we can.

The avoidance of vendor led grey IT would be an area to watch. If we take away the political detailed mandate there is a risk that vendors could become a great deal more powerful in local micro-systems. National integration can be achieved without political ownership, through true engagement of clinicians and patients a final location for digital health can be agreed and reached. It can be agreed without clinicians becoming programmers as well I think. It’s entirely admirable the engagement that many other jurisdictions now have with clinicians. Initiatives like Code for Health and more widely acceptable open source solutions are great where clinicians want to get his involved but are not a prerequisite to clinical engagement or to eHealth being able to move away from short term political direction.

I do need to bring this back to Ireland though. As has been reported in the media, Ireland has an EHR business case it now believes in. The health system itself has approved it as a business case, clinicians, patients and the leadership of the system has made it clear that the 10 year direction in this business case is the right way for Ireland. The issue now though is down to the affordability, and that will always be a political prioritisation piece. A public health system such as Ireland’s can’t ask patients to pay for the IT it uses as a direct cost, although we know that the cost of an EHR in Ireland would be seventeen euro a year per patient. And that’s where the political elements has to remain, they have to be the pay master and therefore they have to be able to take credit and risk for delivery.

If Ireland can agree the 10 year journey, if Ireland can continue to deliver the digital fabric it is doing, with the simple support of an engaged minister’s office and political team then we truly could be the first country in the world to do this effectively in a timely fashion and with the patient at the centre.

A great result is coming our way, and this will be down to the efforts of the full system of support, civil servants, public servants, ministers, clinicians, patients and vendors – a true partnership as a facilitator for success.

Brexit and the CIO!

First published to CIO.CO.UK

Just when you thought every conversation would be about Trump this summer someone decided to press a big button that didn’t say Brexit on it, it said ‘stick it to the man’ and very few people thought that meant leave Europe! Or certainly after the event that is what it feels like. As I have caught up with colleagues, friends and peers I have only found two people who are proud to have voted leave, admittedly one was resplendent in union jack cuff links and belt buckle so maybe shouldn’t count due to crimes against fashion! So much has been written from within the UK about what it could mean for this role we all love, the CIO role post Brexit will change, we have no doubt about that. I am no longer living or working in the UK, whilst only 50 minutes with Ryanair away Ireland is very much a different country, and I love it for that.

The morning of the 24th of June will be one that the modern CIO will remember for years and years to come. It has become the where were you moment of the ‘teenies’, so many people describe the story of turning to their partner and saying, crikey it happened, we are leaving Europe and the look and squeak of complete and utter astonishment from the other person whose twitter feed hadn’t woken them up first. I wonder if Boris and Farage were as shocked as the rest of the globe was.

The google search for how to get an Irish passport over that day is said to have been the most common search in Dublin and then the need to continue the conversation with digital leaders throughout Dublin really began to happen. It has now become the conversation at every meeting of CIOs and IT professionals in this bustling digital city and not having an opinion or a new piece of gossip about the impact is simply not allowed!

The good it will do for Dublin in the short to medium term seems to be huge as more and more companies are said to be looking to have a location in the city, after all it is English speaking, in the EU and with the Euro, not to mention the amazing digital eco-system that has sprung up already. But will it be for the good of the wider Ireland? My own opinion is possibly not; there is a huge risk that Dublin becomes more and more like the London of Harry Enfield’s imagination, where Dublin is the place ‘with’ and much of Ireland becomes the place of aspirations, and that I think could be an Irish outcome of Brexit without very carefully national leadership.

The immediate impact on a CIO delivering digital solutions to health in Ireland has been significant. For example data sharing agreements for the island of Ireland will need to be looked at from a different point of view once article 50 is triggered. The delivery of health care if you are a patient living on the boarder suddenly could be a very different prospect for a non-EU Northern Ireland. The technology to support this will need to have a very different plan to that being considered pre-Brexit.

The 8th of June saw the Republic of Ireland announce an EU member state first, a Health Cloud First policy. Brexit now will mean that a wider consideration of where data goes from a disaster recovery point of view needs to be had, if data is leaving the EU what does that mean and what will the UK data agreements be with a USA. More open and free movement of data between Uncle Sam and the May state is quite a scary prospect to manage with the privacy concerned of Ireland. Certainly a Brexiting UK with May at the helm is already building up a worrying record of a willingness to downgrade digital privacy considerations.

The advisory and consultancy firms that Ireland’s health sector has been working with as it moves towards its full Electronic Health Record programme moved from conversations about NHS expertise and knowledge to different countries overnight, suddenly Canadian knowledge and experience is de rigueur amongst the partners seeking to impress the eHealth Ireland function. Why though, is it because an NHS post Brexit would be less willing to share or simply because the sheer amount of work to now do in the NHS will be simply too big to offer up guidance to Ireland. Personally I don’t believe it is anything to do with the NHS really and more to do with the large consultancy firms trying to stop the conversation being ‘just’ about Brexit and wanting it to remain on topic.

The Brexit promise to the NHS of 350 million a week more in funding was withdrawn by the morning of the vote, the NHS is heading to a deficit that is eye watering and will impact upon the priorities of a minister for health who never really jumped one way or the other when it came to Brexit. In Ireland we have a minister who is insisting that the country needs a ten year plan, or at least a five year plan to reform the health system. The optimism in health in Ireland in a post Brexit world is quite significant, the number of Irish citizens working for the NHS is huge and Brexit just became another leaver to try to persuade them to return home. Around 5,000 of the health staff of Ireland are English though, the thought of not being able to do the job here in Ireland is a nightmare scenario but one that now needs to be on the risk register.

The one thing that as a CIO with a penchant for social media I did come to realise more and more during the run up to Brexit was the concept of a the social media influence bubble. So few people ever seemed to be talking about voting to leave and yet somebody somewhere clearly did make that choice. The dawning thought as social media became awash with despair was that the influence that the social media format has on you is way more to do with the bubble that you are in than a truly independent view of the world. A great many have complained they simply couldn’t get good media facts and knowledge to build up an opinion; maybe there is something in the fact that we are now using social media as a news outlet that hugely influenced that. Brexiters were compared somewhat to an extreme political view, racist with lack of global view. And yet in a post Brexit world clearly that simply cannot be true!

A recent Irish Times article rather tongue in cheek suggested a coming together of Scotland, Ireland and Northern Ireland as an EU state. Whilst done in a mischievous way it grew legs and in less than 24 hours people were discussing this as if it were a real possibility. The desperation to find a way to maintain some of the status quo in the digital world we are trying to live within is having a huge impact on what we think of as the art of the possible. The conversation now needs to shift, away from desperate plans like the ‘Scotireland’ and move towards what needs to be done to make each of our areas of concern work in a new world. Every EU state now needs to have a digital consideration of Brexit and build policy and solutions on how to make this work, the EU of a shared digital future has changed forever and each one of us now has a part to play in understanding what it will look like next.

As something of a post script to this piece, there is a town in county Tipperary called Twomileborris, the name Borris is generally thought to be a Norman word for stronghold or district, maybe, just maybe the work of Boris to deliver a Brexited UK could end up creating an even stronger digital stronghold for Dublin, and with the right considerations and policies the whole of Ireland, certainly the opportunity seems to be stronger than the threat. I had three adoption offers and the passport application process explained to me in detail within 24 hours of Brexit, I hope that means I am going to be in Ireland for some time to come, but I really do hope that the CIO fraternity of the UK can make Brexit work for digital, the whole of the EU still needs it to, in or out!

Engagement – An Interview…

First published in HIMSS engagement and integrated care…

At the 2016 EU eHealth week in Amsterdam a number of commentators made an example of the clinical and patient engagement coming out of Ireland around the digital health landscape. This from a country that until recently had made little impact on the health IT area due to past systemic underinvestment and a lack of agreed direction.

In the last 18 months Ireland has rapidly began a programme that it describes as its Knowledge and Information plan. The programme sees Ireland learning from the success and errors of other jurisdictions with an expressed desire to ‘leap frog’ other countries and put information at the heart of its healthcare reform agenda.

Richard Corbridge is the Chief Information Officer of the health service in Ireland and the Chief Executive of the entity the Irish government has formed to achieve its digital ambition, eHealth Ireland. One of the first appointments made after its formation was to put in place a Chief Clinical Information Officer, this role was awarded to Yvonne Goff a radiographer by clinical background and now Ireland’s technology professional of the year. We asked both of them to comment on the recent success Ireland has had

Yvonne Goff wanted to comment first on clinical engagement,

‘It has been over twelve months since the Council of Clinical Information Officers was established with the aim of bringing together clinicians and practitioners to guide the successful delivery of eHealth solutions across the Irish healthcare system. The council is composed of clinical leaders from diverse backgrounds including, leaders, academics and suppliers, the CCIO has expanded to a network of over 200 members across many regions and disciplines.’

Richard Corbridge added,

‘The number of engaged clinicians in Ireland has been a key to the success of several projects in 2015/16 and continues to be the bedrock that we build engagement upon. It has been commented on that over 200 CCIOs is a large number and we have been asked how can they be so engaged? The reason why is the absolute desire to make the eHealth agenda work and deliver for patients and clinicians. The CCIO in Ireland has been formed to provide not just an advisory group but a clinical leadership workforce.’

The CCIO in Ireland is able to highlight the importance of collaborating with clinicians to ensure projects can be designed, developed, and delivered successfully.

In order to build an understanding of the benefits and implementation capability needed for an Electronic Health Record; eHealth Ireland is investing resources into three clinical project areas – epilepsy, hemophilia, and bipolar disorder. These projects are known collectively as the Lighthouse Projects, each are clinically lead and the CCIO collaborates with a number of other academic and charity organisations in order to advance and deliver these important projects, all in one year.

As well as building the clinical engagement Ireland has had to rebuild its technology function, up until early 2015 it was a function that was able to deliver local excellence but had not been able to work as a single national system. Under the new function of eHealth Ireland and the Office of the CIO the function has evolved to become a truly national set of functions. The CIO has achieved this through a continuous engagement process, adopting digital solutions to engage the staff who are located throughout Ireland. The team has used a wide range of tools to continue to evolve this engagement. Richard Corbridge described these different tools and initiatives,

‘The first thing we had to do in this space was to bring staff together for a face to face, something that in nine years that had not happened, we agreed to facilitate this happening twice a year and so far these have gone extraordinarily well with teams having the opportunity to present their projects and a series of guest speakers ranging from a futurologist through to an academic on the theory of communications. This has galvanized engagement from within, inspiring staff to take control and further drive engagement. New projects have been started by staff such as #eHealthmoments an enterprise facilitating staff to connect on a deeper level using digital technologies and Quality Innovation Corridor (QIC) Programme an initiative to open up innovation pathways through which clinicians, in collaboration with eHealth Ireland expertise, can seek seed-funding for creative digital solutions and assistance in deploying these.

However he does then go on to describe how different solutions have also been required to keep building on the engagement and enthusiasm,

‘We have recorded video interviews, and podcasts some of which have been broadcast live featuring all of the senior management team. We have used animations and story boards extensively to build a level of knowledge of each project and have used these to facilitate a wider understanding for all citizens of what it means to create a digital fabric in health that is needed to achieve a truly integrated healthcare system. One of the health system in Ireland’s core vision statements is to be transparent, social media engagement has enabled an explosion in this area. Project leaders and team members have embraced this vision and really built networks of people willing and ready to engage. It was a real shock to the system to see leadership openly engage through the use of social media; however it has now become a normal solution for communicating, which has truly been inspirational for the health system.

The continued evolution of communications with the CCIO group has been equally important to Yvonne Goff who explained why,

‘To me it is hugely important that the CCIO group continues to grow, expand and diversify to ensure that they are best placed to deliver for Ireland. The building of relationships with other CCIOs, advising appropriate direction for best practices around procurement and adoption of eHealth solutions is our reason for being.’

She went on to say how this engagement has been achieved, ‘the CCIO recognises that one of the most effective ways to engage and collaborate is through social media and digital networking. The twitter handle @CCIO_IRL is used regularly to communicate with clinicians, health informaticians, and other interested stakeholders. The CCIO also regularly take part in discussion and discourse on social media and in the CCIO discussion forum. The CCIO successfully hosted #irishmed Twitter hour resulting in its second busiest hour generating nearly five million impressions. The CCIO come together once a quarter as a group and are embracing digital solutions to ensure that the most can be gained from each meeting.’

Yvonne Goff then summarised with the rallying call, ‘the CCIO is making a positive and lasting difference to Irish Healthcare. And through discourse, collaboration and important projects it is committed to working together in order to implement clinically lead solutions that improve the quality of healthcare and the well-being of Irish citizens.’

The two leaders of the Irish healthcare IT revolution clearly have engagement as a priority, Richard Corbridge went on to round off by saying, ‘we need to take the whole system on a journey, we have managed to create a great environment for clinicians to become part of the team, we need to do the same for citizens and patients, the eHealth Ireland committee recently tasked us with recruiting a patient to the key governance function of Ireland which will be a great starting point for person centered care to truly come to fruition.’

He finished by saying, ‘a friend recently used the phrase ‘legitimate theft’ when describing the sharing of best practice, Ireland has done this to create what it has put in place, the offer is there for any jurisdiction to come forward and reuse what has been developed here, shared learning is a great way to ensure we all have the best engaged staff we possibly can have.’

To contact eHealth Ireland about this, why not do so via social media, @eHealthIreland is their twitter handle and they will definitely come back to anyone wanting to know more.

Guest Blog – Rocking the Future Health Summit

Thursday 25th of May 2016, The eHealth Festival rocked the stage at the Future Health Summit in City West. No festival would be complete without some audio visual fireworks and with this in mind, we opened with a powerful music video painstakingly produced by Elaine Naughton

The video, which wouldn’t have been out of place at the MTV awards, showcased different countries where music legends such as Bowie and The Beatles and neatly segwayed to all the countries where eHealth Legends came from. These countries included Estonia, Botswana, UK, Denmark, Spain, Australia and I have an honorable mention to my own Northern Ireland.  The scene was set for the day: High energy and involvement would be the recipe for a succesfull day. Twitter handles were provided so anyone could tweet the speakers and ask questions using the hashtag: #eHealthFestival. Notably, we were trending in Ireland within the hour.

The speakers for the day embraced the festival theme and played the part of rockstars by choosing their own song to enter onto the stage. Musical references were dotted throughout the presentations some of our Rockstars-for-the-day even dressed up in festival gear to present.

First up to speak was Tony Shannon and Andy Williams from Answer Consulting. They spoke in detail about the critical state of health around the world and how effective sharing of information can mean better care for the patient. Andy spoke about how transformation is needed in digital health and it is his belief that a huge transformation will happen in 5 years or less. He spoke about the importance of open source and the growth in demand witnessed in just the last year alone.  Richard Corbridge reiterated their thoughts and argued that  health spend is actually an investment for the future rather than just a short term budget item.

The next rock star on the bill was Andy Kinnear. Andy gave great insights from his learning in the digital transformation journey in Bristol. The countless benefits they are reaping now include the amazing research opportunities that become available through a shared network. When I asked Andy about how to create a culture that encourages innovation, he replied that“ You need to create a spirit where loyalty is with the people you serve  – the public not the organisation. You should reinforce this mind-set that all you do is for the patients.” It is heartening for me to see that this is exactly what eHealth Ireland are doing by putting their patient: at the centre.

Naomi Fein from Think Visual took to her new found rock star status like a duck to water as she ran up and down the stage interacting with the audience. I have had the pleasure of working with Naomi on a few projects and she is truly inspirational. Naomi spoke to us about leveraging empathy to create clarity. She took everyone through an interactive process ensuring that any plans that we make are truly impactful. The message must be “memorable, actionable, and shareable”.  To ensure this we need to start this (planning) process before we communicate by asking –

  • Why do you want to communicate something?
  • Who are you communicating to?
  • how do you do this?

If we can do this with empathy for our audience it can give us fresh insights, new language and clearer priorities. Naomi’s fiinal piece of advice was: Before communicating, it is imperative to separate between what is true but useless, and what is relevant.  This last point was particularly poignant because I feel that often times, we ourselves are overawed with too much information.

Joanna Smith, CIO of Royal Brompton Trust was next up and she set the scene by entering to The David Bowie number “Changes”. She spoke about her experiences within digital transformation in health. She had a lack of engagement at the beginning of her journey as they had no strategy or plan. Joanna used the analogy of growing a garden and how they had to strip everything away, draw up a plan and get the basics right before they could change their system. The now familiar theme of the patient being at the centre was spoken about again and how important it is to have easily accessible and user friendly technology.  Joanna also argued that patients should be widely informed as they are interested in these technological advancements. Joanna echoed the importance of building relationships: a common theme from all the speakers and how she felt that one of the biggest challenges is managing change and trust. She gave some great advice on picking your battles, knowing when to give up and knowing when to push a head. In my own experience, this sound advice could apply to many things in life, including raising children.

Julie Bellew and Brian Canavan from the HSE were late additions to the bill after the successful launch of #eHealthMoments.  I have had the pleasure of working with this team to develop this idea. It is based on the premise that internal communication is central to how an organisation is run. Up to 70% of Organisational change fails and one of the more commonly cited  reasons for this failure is poor communication. This internal communication is truly engagement from within and was developed when both these members of staff were inspired at an All Staff Day in March. The concept is based on “Hello My Name is” created by Kate Grainger. Each member of staff can make a short video clip about who they are and what they do. These clips are uploaded to a private forum created for these staff. Previously there was no real link between the staff as they are traditionally dispersed throughout the country and rarely get to meet. This provides everyone the chance to introduce themselves, put a face to the name and get to know a little bit more about each other. Julie and Brian want to change people’s opinion of the HSE and want to make it fun as they do it. I was sitting beside a few of the speakers at the time of this presentation and they loved it. They took pictures and said it was an initiative they were going to bring back to their own organisations and was so simple but extremely effective.

After lunch Richard Gibson, research director at Gartner spoke about personalisation with healthcare and the importance of patient engagement. He explained how simple technologies like websites can help engage by providing information and portals connecting patients with their information. Richard spoke of many cool technologies that provide great advantages to the user such as fitness trackers, sleep wristbands, devices that keep track of your habits and home diagnostic stations: All technologies that are revolutionising how we live our lives.

We had the lovely Amanda Neylon  up next, who danced onto the stage with the song “What a Feeling” from Flash Dance. Amanda was in charge of the digital transformation of Macmillan Cancer Care support. She told an inspirational story about her journey there.  The purpose of the organisations was to support people and help them take control of their situation. To do this they took a huge amount of paper information and made 50% of it available through digital services. Social Media put digital at the heart of the organisation. She echoed Naomi by stressing that “you must understand your audience” and through this understanding they segmented their audience through behaviours rather than demographically.  Amanda also spoke about the importance of collaboration, iteration and evaluation through all the different stages. Her final word was to be brave and allow people the opportunity to grow through experimenting with what works and what doesn’t.  If things don’t work the first time around, simply move forward and try something new.

Clare Sanderson (@IGcom) from IG Solutions was our final presenter and was representing the security and governance side of the festival. She also spoke around the importance of engaging with the public early and informing them on each of the stages you are going through. There is great opportunity to learn from other people’s mistakes by being up front with patients about where their information is going.  Research conducted by The Wellcome Trust found that people generally didn’t know where their information is going. Clare spoke about a really interesting concept called Citizen Juries. During this process people hear case studies around the use of data by health care professionals. This process proved that the more information a patient has around the digital transformation, the more positive they are about it. Clare also pointed out an extremely important issue: that there should be explicit consent and the right to object. I asked Clare about the best ways to do this and she gave some interesting ideas such as having the issue as a story plot on popular TV shows. Maybe we could ask Richard’s agent to arrange a cameo on Fair City.

The finale of the show was a panel discussion with the A&R personnel namely vendors – Cerner, CSC, IMS Maxims and HCI. Richard asked the panelists to sell to the audience on why their company should be the one to push forward this transformation in eHealth. Many of them touched on the fact that Ireland could be built as a centre of eHealth excellence and the importance of the integration off different systems.  They echoed the importance of being engaged with patients early and ensuring that they go through the decisions with you, putting healthcare back into their hands and also the belief that data sharing is a common sense approach.

Richard rounded up the day with the reiteration that community is an area often forgotten yet it is crucial to the development of eHealth. He spoke about delivering everyone in the HSE a digital identity and how the HSE is opening up to innovation through eHealth Connect  and The Quality Innovation Corridor (QIC). This was a very positive end to an extremely positive day. I spoke to a number of people after the event and they were delighted with the festival there was great energy, enthusiasm and optimism around the future of eHealth in Ireland. It really is amazing to have been part of this day and I want to say a big thank to Richard for giving me the opportunity me to co-host the event with him. I look forward to seeing how the ehealth transformation continues to evolve in the near future.

For more information on what is happening in eHealth in Ireland go to www.eHealthIreland.ie

SPEACIL THANKS to Blathnaid Cluskey who is interning at the HSE she is a Communications Student at DCU. She has a strong passion for media and using it to connect with different audiences and helped ensure that it was possible to create this review of the day.

A festival of eHealth!

A year ago we were invited to be involved in the Future Health summit for the first time. We built a house as the theme for the event, from blue print to decoration eHealth experts from across the EU used the story of creating a new build as an analogy to describe how eHealth Ireland could build on the foundations it was putting in place to create an eHealth system that could deliver a digital fabric for health in Ireland.

A year later and we have a different theme this year. The eHealth Festival has been pulled together, imagine the process of moving from foundations to a woven digital fabric throughout the country and the complexity of doing this, we have landed on an analogy for this too, putting on the mega festivals across the world, Coachella, Glastonbury and Electric Picnic. Surely a task with a long term view, a success criteria that includes immediate success and bringing joy to millions of people. The team are working hard to put on the festival all day on Thursday.

The eHealth Festival is a truly global affair, taking lessons and experiences of digital health from across the globe and applying them to the plans for Ireland. The first stages will be to consider what it takes to find the right festival site and theme, applied to the delivery of eHealth this section will focus very much on how to set the vision for the future as thoroughly as possible. A number of key speakers with NHS experiences will provide us insight into how engagement was gained at a plethora of sites with very different focuses ranging from a wide ocal geography coming together to adopt a standards based approach to the adoption of an open source model across a major cities record sharing approach and on to a major London hospitals insistence to get it right and not ‘simply’ follow the model brought to bear before.

Every guest speaker has been set a number of music festival themed challenges over the day too, ranging from the slightly different event photograph to a whole series of theme songs being picked; some of the music could get loud! Picking the theme songs has been an important part for each of the presentations as it will reflect the theme of where the presentation goes, so listen out for that.

In keeping with the way eHealth Ireland has evolved over the last year there will be some focus on the way we engage on technology in health as well. One of our partners Think Visual will be able to provide a different insight into how to engage clinicians and patients in a different way, using pictures and visuals to create a journey for them to join us on. This promises to be an exciting look into the art of the possible in this area.

Our focus has been on health care and a somewhat traditional version of health care over the last twelve months, the ability to deliver a new paradigm of research capacity with digital health must not be forgotten, nor must the citizen choice in how this occurs. With this in mind we have a speaker with a huge amount of experience making a health charity digitally capable, the lessons we can take from this I am sure will set the agenda for us in this space.

As with last year we have tried hard with the theme and the brieif to speakers to keep the ‘sales pitch’ presentations away, at the eHealth Festival it would be like the Darkness reforming! But, we need to create relationships with the vendor community over the next year that is a for sure! So in keeping with the festival theme the vendor community will be putting on the record label A&R man guise and trying to encourage us to understand why their label is the one of choice, why they are the Factory Records of the 1990s and not the SAW of the 1980s.

To round off the day we have a speaker by very popular demand, an expert in information governance, information security and getting the handling of data right. Asking a lady from Liverpool to speak on the theme of securing a festival is always going to be a little dangerous so expect some fun to round the day off.

As with any great festival there will be a few secret unannounced shows too by way of a couple of announcements that should set a tone that is exciting for the next twelve months, initiatives with internal and external focuses.

All that really will remain to say is… Put Your Hands Up For Detroit – All will be revealed!

 

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